OE orthographics: seeing OE/PDE correspondences (PDE: Origins p. 27)

Review: relevant phonemic symbols & PDE examples                

 

Front

Back

High

i                                                   

/fit/         feet  

rounded, not in PDE 

/pul/            pool

 

e  

/fet/            fate                  

o

/pol/            pole

Low

  

/ft/            fat                   

ɑ

/pɑl/            pall

*NB: Pyles and Algeo use /y/ for the sound in year


OE generally

Some sounds have been lost since OE:

 

o        sidenote: sometimes short <u> ends up spelled as <o>: love, son
OE vowels (see Origins p. 95)

Some unfamiliar graphs:

<>

<y>: high & front like /i/, but rounded: //

But in general OE used the same vowel symbols that Latin did and we do

 

         pronounced differently now than in OE (worry about that later)

         sometimes correspond to a different PDE spelling

o       so, OE <>

         to PDE <-ou->: cld =

         or PDE <-ow> in c, n =

o       so, <> in OE lm

         to PDE <-oa-> or <o-e>: bt =

        so, gt ->

         but sometimes the spelling is not so different

o       so, <> in OE lf -> PDE life

o       so, <> in OE mr -> PDE moor

o       so, <> in OE hdan -> PDE heed

         OE <o> also ended up as PDE <ee> /i/

         Why? the diphthong smoothed and merged with <>

           so, fro -> 

         but sometimes cosan ->


OE consonants (cf Origins p. 96, Problems 5.6)

The letters <c> and <g> are overworked

And...

Fricatives

In OE, /h/ <h> had a wider distribution than it has now

In OE, you dont find the letters <v> or <z>, and (as in PDE), <> and <> can represent the voiceless and voiced sounds. [There arent letters for voiced fricatives because they werent phonemic in OE.]

seofon, ofen

[v]

fisc       

[f]

frosan   

[z]

seofon 

[s]

oer  

[]                       

oht 

[θ]

 

OE also has some other unfamiliar consonant clusters

OE <ea> = PDE <a>                  scearp            =