ENG 201Y (L5201): READING POETRY

DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH / SCHOOL FOR CONTINUING STUDIES

University of Toronto 2001-2002

© Ian Lancashire 2001

 

PLEASE NOTE: YOU MUST REGISTER WITH US TO ATTEND CLASSES.

Every student should obtain a Prometheus login and password by the first week of classes. To get these, please send an e-mail with the subject heading "ENG 201Y L5201" to Dr. Bruce Meyer at

bruce.meyer@utoronto.ca
and include both your full name and your student number. The login for your course account will be your last name, and your password will be your student number. An e-mailing will then go out to you with additional technical information about the Prometheus system. Note that the first (on-line) class for this course will take place on Thursday September 13 at 7 pm.

There is no physical classroom on campus for this section.

  1. General Description of Course
  2. Texts
  3. Provisional Schedule
  4. Course Requirements
  5. Short-list of Reference Works

1. General Description of Course

This 26-week course introduces you to poetry in English, to its traditional forms, themes, techniques, and uses of language, to its historical and geographical range, and to its diversity in modern times. We will pay close attention to metre, rhyme, stanzaic form, figurative language, and the resources that English as a language supplies poets, and explore how poetry reflects the life and times of its authors and readers.

During the first 13 weeks we will focus on poems from the sixteenth century to the nineteenth century. In the second term we will study modern poets from different regions of the English-speaking world.

This section of ENG 201Y is an experimental Internet-based course, meeting on-line in the SCS Prometheus chatroom once a week to discuss the lecture material and to meet in tutorial.

Each week, students will read the assigned poems and the on-line lecture material on them. Each week focuses on a cluster of related works, usually a well-known poem (a touchstone, representative of the best of its kind) and one or more other poems written about it by modern poets.

2. Texts and Resources

3. Provisional Schedule

 

4. Course Requirements

These will be substantially the same as for a section not held on-line. Assignments and grades are tentatively as follows:

Responses may consist of specific observations about words, allusions, and figures of speech, comments on aspects of the lecture material, or analysis of the poem from a different viewpoint. Each response should be reasoned and well-written.

Requirements will be finalized in the second week of the course.

5. Short-list of Reference Works