Grammar practice for exam

A. Identify the part of speech of the underlined words.

1. The person I met goes to my school.
2. The person I met goes to my school.
3. The person I met goes to my school.
4. The person I met goes to my school.
5. The person I met goes to my school.
6. The person I met goes to my school.
7. The person I met goes to my school.
8. Do you like apples or oranges?
9. Do you like apples or oranges?
10. Do you like apples or oranges?
11. Do you like apples or oranges?
12. Do you like apples or oranges?
13. Do you like apples or oranges?
14. Do you like apples, or do you like oranges?
15. Do you like apples, or do you like oranges?
16. Do you like apples, or do you like oranges?
17. Do you like apples, or do you like oranges?
18. Do you like apples, or do you like oranges?
19. Do you like apples, or do you like oranges?
20. Do you like apples, or do you like oranges?
21. Do you like apples, or do you like oranges?
22. Do you like apples, or do you like oranges?
23. If you give me an orange, I'll give you an apple.
24. If you give me an orange, I'll give you an apple.
25. If you give me an orange, I'll give you an apple.
26. If you give me an orange, I'll give you an apple.
27. Give me an apple quickly.
28. Give me an apple quickly.
29. Give me an apple quickly.
30. I'll have an apple, but I really want a juicy orange.
31. I'll have an apple, but I really want a juicy orange.
32. I'll have an apple, but I really want a juicy orange.
33. I'll have an apple, but I really want a juicy orange.
34. If you are sick of stupid sentences about fruit, you are not alone.
35. If you are sick of stupid sentences about fruit, you are not alone.
36. If you are sick of stupid sentences about fruit, you are not alone.
37. If you are sick of stupid sentences about fruit, you are not alone.
38. If you are sick of stupid sentences about fruit, you are not alone.
39. If you are sick of stupid sentences about fruit, you are not alone.
40. If you are sick of stupid sentences about fruit, you are not alone.
41. If you are sick of stupid sentences about fruit, you are not alone.
42. If you are sick of stupid sentences about fruit, you are not alone.
43. When parsing sentences, look for a main verb for every clause.
44. When parsing sentences, look for a main verb for every clause.
45. When parsing sentences, look for a main verb for every clause.
46. When parsing sentences, look for a main verb for every clause.
47. When parsing sentences, look for a main verb for every clause.
48. When parsing sentences, look for a main verb for every clause.
49. When parsing sentences, look for a main verb for every clause.
50. When parsing sentences, look for a main verb for every clause.
51. Remember that a verb can consist of auxiliary verbs with the finite verb.
52. Remember that a verb can consist of auxiliary verbs with the finite verb.
53. Remember that a verb can consist of auxiliary verbs with the finite verb.
54. Remember that a verb can consist of auxiliary verbs with the finite verb.
55. Adverbs can be tricky: they slip quickly through your fingers.
56. Adverbs can be tricky: they slip quickly through your fingers.
57. Adverbs can be tricky: they slip quickly through your fingers.
58. Adverbs can be tricky: they slip quickly through your fingers.
59. I knew her briefly, but, ah, how sweet those days were.
60. I knew her briefly, but, ah, how sweet those days were.
61. I knew her briefly, but, ah, how sweet those days were.
62. I knew her briefly, but, ah, how sweet those days were.
63. I knew her briefly, but, ah, how sweet those days were.
64. I knew her briefly, but, ah, how sweet those days were.
65. She left; however, I remember her well.
66. She left; however, I remember her well.
67. She left; however, I remember her well.
68. She left; however, I remember her well.
69. She left; however, I remember her well.
70. She left; however, I remember her well.

B. Identify whether the underlined word is the subject, subject complement, direct object, or indirect object.

1. The person I met goes to my school.
2. The person I met goes to my school.
3. Do you like apples or oranges?
4. Do you like apples or oranges?
5. Do you like apples or oranges?
6. Do you like apples, or do you like oranges?
7. Do you like apples, or do you like oranges?
8. If you give me an orange, I'll give you an apple.
9. If you give me an orange, I'll give you an apple.
10. If you give me an orange, I'll give you an apple.
11. If you give me an orange, I'll give you an apple.
12. If you give me an orange, I'll give you an apple.
13. Give me an apple quickly.
14. Give me an apple quickly.
15. I'll have an apple, but I really want a juicy orange.
16. I'll have an apple, but I really want a juicy orange.
17. I'll have an apple, but I really want a juicy orange.
18. If you are sick of stupid sentences about fruit, you are not alone.
19. If you are sick of stupid sentences about fruit, you are not alone.
20. If you are sick of stupid sentences about fruit, you are not alone.
21. If you are sick of stupid sentences about fruit, you are not alone.
22. When parsing sentences, look for a main verb for every clause.
23. Adverbs can be tricky: they slip quickly through your fingers.
24. Adverbs can be tricky: they slip quickly through your fingers.
25. I knew her briefly, but, ah, how sweet those days were.
26. I knew her briefly, but, ah, how sweet those days were.
27. I knew her briefly, but, ah, how sweet those days were.
28. She left; however, I remember her well.
29. She left; however, I remember her well.
30. She smelled the roses, and when she came back she smelled sweet.
31. She smelled the roses, and when she came back she smelled sweet.
32. She smelled the roses, and when she came back she smelled sweet.
33. The person whom I met already knew who I was.
34. The person whom I met already knew who I was.
35. The person whom I met already knew who I was.
36. The person whom I met already knew who I was.
37. The person whom I met already knew who I was.
38. Did you see the ball?
39. Did you see the ball?
40. Don't be a Dick Dewey: don't forget your nuts in the woods.