Courses currently taught:


Undergraduate


NMC 225F Introducing the Greek New Testament
The course aims at acquainting the student with so-called biblical Greek and therefore pays some attention to its Semitic background, mediated through the Septuagint (the Old Testament-in-Greek). The primary focus is a systematic and thorough review of Greek grammar, illustrated by readings from the Gospel of Luke. Thus, typically, two class periods of grammar review are followed by one period of reading. A study of Greek sentence structure and typology is used to show the repetitive nature of grammatical phenomena and thus to promote reading skills and interpretation of the text.
Even though a complete review of grammar is provided, the course presupposes the equivalent of one year of introductory ancient Greek.

Texts:
Greek New Testament (UBS ed.), supplied courtesy the Canadian Bible Society.
Goetchius, Van Ness Eugene, The Language of the New Testament. Supplementary notes are distributed as needed.
Arndt-Gingrich-Danker, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament.
Other (photocopied) materials will be supplied at cost.

Prerequisite: One full course in ancient Greek or permission of instructor.


NMC 227S The Greek New testament and related writings
This course builds directly on NMC 225F and therefore presupposes the kind of grammar review it offers. Readings include a cross-section of the New Testament and, typically, two texts from other Early Christian or Jewish literature. One additional text is read from a manuscript (papyrus) facsimile, in order to stimulate awareness of language change (cf. phonetic spelling) and ancient handwriting (cf. scribal mistakes), both of which gave rise to numerous textual variations during the history of transmission.
Selections will be from Luke, Acts, 2Timothy, Ignatius, Joseph&Aseneth.

Texts:
Greek New Testament (UBS ed.), supplied courtesy the Canadian Bible Society, if not already received in NMC 225F
Arndt-Gingrich-Danker, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament.
Other (photocopied) materials will be supplied at cost.

Prerequisite: NMC 225F or permission of instructor.


NMC 325F FRAGMENTARY TEXTS OF GREEK-SPEAKING JEWRY (offered alternate years)
Greek-speaking Jewry not only translated its Bible into Greek but also created a rich variety of literature directly based on the Bible. The primary texts read in this course are the so-called "fragmentary historians," that is, writers of the Hellenistic period whose works have survived only in extensive excerpts in later authors. Though these texts are incomplete, they offer fascinating glimpses of preoccupations and concerns Jews felt as they interacted with Greek culture. Later Christian writers regarded this literature as part of the "preparation for the Gospel" and thus, fortunately, preserved it.
Authors include Demetrius the Historian, Eupolemus, Artapanus, Aristeas the Historian, Cleodemus and Pseudo-Eupolemus.
An important component of the course is a study of Greek word-building, focused on improving the student's reading skills.

Texts:
A standard Greek-English lexicon such as Arndt-Gingrich-Danker, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament or Liddell-Scott-Jones, A Greek-English Lexicon.
Texts to be read will be supplied at cost in photocopy. Electronic copies are also available.
Hand-outs on Greek word-building.

Prerequisite: Two full courses in Greek or permission of instructor

NMC 326F NOVELS OF THE GREEK APOCRYPHA (offered in alternate years)
Beginning in the third century BC(E), Hebrew "biblical" literature was being translated into Greek, the common language of the Hellenistic and Graeco-Roman periods. Included in this translated literature are some of the best-known romances of the Bible. Books read in this course are Tobit, extant in two major versions reflecting varying degrees of literary development and distance from its Semitic original, and Judith, a book translated from Hebrew into a kind of "King Jamesian" Greek. The first book is a story of self-conscious piety and threatened love, and the second relates the tale of a woman whose beauty and cunning caused a mighty general to lose his head.
An important component of the course is a study of Greek word-building, aimed at improving the student's reading skills.

Texts:
A standard Greek-English lexicon such as Arndt-Gingrich-Danker, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament or Liddell-Scott-Jones, A Greek-English Lexicon.
Rahlfs, A. Septuaginta vol. 1 (American Bible Society edition is 2 volumes in 1)
Hand-outs on Greek word-building.

Prerequisite: Two full courses in Greek or permission of instructor


NMC 327S JEWISH HISTORIANS WHO WROTE IN GREEK (offered in alternate years)
In the second century BC(E), Palestinian Jewry experienced one of the greatest upheavals in its existence, popularly known as the Maccabaean Revolt. The primary texts relating the tale are the so-called first and second Books of the Maccabees, translated and composed, respectively, in Greek. In this course 2 Maccabees is read, supplemented by selections from Josephus' Antiquities of the Jews bk 12. Both these texts, though Jewish in origin, were treasured and transmitted by Christians, and thus are of great importance for both traditions.
An important component of the course is a study of Greek word-building, focused on improving the student's reading skills.

Texts:
A standard Greek-English lexicon such as Arndt-Gingrich-Danker, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament or Liddell-Scott-Jones, A Greek-English Lexicon.
Rahlfs, A. Septuaginta vol. 1 (American Bible Society edition is 2 volumes in 1)
Other texts to be read will be supplied at cost in photocopy.
Hand-outs on Greek word-building.

Prerequisite: Two full courses in Greek or permission of instructor


NMC 328S JEWISH NOVELS COMPOSED IN GREEK (offered in alternate)
Though most of the literature included in the so-called Septuagint or Old Testament-in-Greek was translated from Hebrew (or Aramaic), literary development of certain individual books in their new linguistic form continued. A fascinating example of such continued development is the well-known book of Esther. Its oldest Greek version is a fascinating fusion of many strands. Not only is it, in part, a translation of a Hebrew text much like our present one, as well as representing certain portions of Semitic text now lost, but it also features episodes extensively re-told in the process of translation and materials which were, at the outset, composed in Greek. The result of this literary development can only be described as profound. A second, and later, Greek version makes further adjustments to the story.
The oldest Greek text will be read, with some attention being devoted to the second Greek version. Further, we will read "Joseph the Tobiad," the story of an enterprising Jew who "made good" in the Hellenistic world -- a tale told by Josephus in Antiquities of the Jews bk 12.
An important component of the course is a study of Greek word-building, focused on improving the student's reading skills.

Texts:
A standard Greek-English lexicon such as Arndt-Gingrich-Danker, A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament or Liddell-Scott-Jones, A Greek-English Lexicon.
Rahlfs, A. Septuaginta vol. 1 (American Bible Society edition is 2 volumes in 1)
Other texts to be read will be supplied at cost in photocopy.
Hand-outs on Greek word-building.

Prerequisite: Two full courses in Greek or permission of instructor


Graduate


NMC 1308Y Septuagint Criticism (1)
The course aims to introduce the student to the text-critical use of the Septuagint (the Old Testament in Greek) in the study of the Hebrew Bible (the Old Testament). Variant readings in Septuagint manuscripts will be assessed to determine their relative claim to originality, their significance in the transmission history of the Greek text, and their relationship to known Hebrew manuscripts. Selection of texts to be read is guided in part by student interest. Regular class presentations and a major research paper (or equivalent) will be required. A working knowledge of Hebrew is presupposed.


NMC 1313Y Septuagint Criticism (2)
This course is a continuation of NES 1308Y, but attention will be focused on the Septuagint as a body of literature in its own right rather than as a tool in biblical text-criticism. Consequently, items of exegetical interest and Septuagint lexicography play an important role. Selection of texts to be studied is guided in part by student interest. Regular class presentations and a major research paper (or equivalent) will be required. A working knowledge of Hebrew is presupposed.


NMC 1353Y Josephus
Readings in the Greek text will include the wide variety of speeches throughout the Jewish War which Josephus attributes both to himself and other actors in the drama of AD 66-74. In addition to details of the Josephan text and its interpretation, discussion will centre on such questions as the speeches' verisimilitude, their historiographical role and their importance for understanding Josephus' view of the war against Rome. Regular class presentations and a major research paper (or equivalent) will be required.


NMC 1355Y Hellenistic Greek Religious Literature
One or more literary works of Jewish origin, composed or translated into Greek, will be studied. The focus of interest will vary with the text(s) selected. Regular class presentations and a major research paper (or equivalent) will be required. A working knowledge of Hebrew is presupposed.