Phthong

Phthong copyright (c) 1997. Henry Rogers, Michael Stairs, and the University of Toronto.

Welcome to Phthong

This program is a tutorial for the phonemic transcription of English. There are two types of exercises that Phthong presents to the user. The first type presents a phonemically transcribed word and asks the user to enter the corresponding English word in the box provided. The second kind of exercise presents an English word and asks the user to enter the phonemic equivalent by clicking on the phonemic symbols along the top of the screen.


There are currently two sets of exercises available for Phthong, both designed for Linguistics Department courses, here at the University of Toronto. Please choose from the two course choices below, to begin the tutorial.

Phthong has been tested with a number of browsers including Netscape 3.0, Netscape 4.0, and Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0 under Windows 95. Please let us know if Phthong fails in your JAVA enabled browser.


Development History

Phthong has been developed over a number of years by Henry Rogers and Michael Stairs. Originally, it was written in HyperCard for the Macintosh computer and has been used in that form successfully for a number of years at the University of Toronto. Stairs has been responsible for the computer design and programming of both the HyperCard and JAVA versions; Rogers has been responsible for the pedagogical design. Michael Stairs works for the CHASS facility (Computing in the Humanities and Social Sciences) at the University of Toronto. Henry Rogers is an associate professor in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Toronto.

Phthong is now also being used for a French course at the University of Waterloo.

Last revised October 4, 1999.

Setup

Instructors may choose to go to the Phthong setup page for information on how to obtain Phthong, and how modify the exercises and phonetic alphabet to suit their course needs.

Code Credits

The development of this program was made easier by using three classes developed by others:


Henry Rogers
Department of Linguistics
University of Toronto
http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~rogers
rogers@chass.utoronto.ca

Michael Stairs (Systems/Applications Programmer)
Computing in the Humanities and Social Sciences
University of Toronto
http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~stairs
stairs@chass.utoronto.ca